“Myanmar always talks about verification in repatriation discussions. But it is mysterious that they want to take back these specific people without verification,” Kalam, the commissioner for refugee aid and repatriation, told Benar News, an online intelligence service linked to the FRG. Kalam told reporters on Monday that all preparations had been made and that he was “optimistic” about a new repatriation process that is expected to begin on Thursday. Kalam expressed disappointment that the repatriation has again bogged down, saying Bangladesh has “done our best to help the Rohingya return home.” He said it is now up to the Myanmar authorities to address the problems of the Rohingya “sincerely and convincingly”. But repatriation cannot be done safely in a short period of time. That would be both dangerous and premature. In early January, myanmar`s military admitted: their soldiers captured, executed and buried 10 Rohingya in a mass grave The failed repatriation efforts come when a UN report revealed the extent to which the Myanmar army, known as the Tatmadaw, has systematically carried out sexual violence, including the gang rape of men and women, as part of a strategy to intimidate the Rohingya during eviction operations in 2016 and began in 2017. It was these raids that caused the exodus of more than 700,000 Rohingya to Bangladesh, where they still live in abandoned camps. Both countries agreed that repatriation would be voluntary. And most refugees say they will only return if their safety is assured, if their homes can be rebuilt and if they are no longer subject to official discrimination. None of these conditions are given. Myanmar`s government had authorized the repatriation of more than 3,000 Rohingya to the country from Thursday, but as in the first repatriation attempt in November, no refugees agreed to voluntarily take the buses to Myanmar.

Mohammad Abul Kalam, Bangladesh`s head of refugee aid and repatriation, said on Thursday that efforts would continue in the coming days. UNHCR has interviewed only a third of the 3,450 refugees or 1,037 families as part of the agency`s intent investigations, he said. The bilateral return agreement between Bangladesh and Myanmar is not the first such initiative for both countries; A similar agreement was sealed in 1992. A first agreement, reached on 23 November 2017, laid the foundation for the repatriation agreement, which provided for the return to Myanmar of thousands of Rohingya from Bangladesh. She promised to ensure that restitution was a “safe, secure and dignified” process. More than 730,000 Rohingya have fled Rakhine State in camps in Bangladesh – and 200,000 are already present – after a military offensive in August 2017, but virtually none have volunteered to return, dethough countries signed a repatriation agreement last year. “The agreement will provide a framework for UNHCR and UNDP to access Rakhine State, including places of origin of refugees and areas of potential return that have not been allowed since the outbreak of violence in August 2017,” UNHCR said in a statement on Thursday. UNHCR agreed with the Governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar that any repatriation of refugees should be voluntary, safe and dignified. Compliance with these principles will also contribute, in practice, to ensuring that the yield is sustainable..

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